The MiniOmni Bone Densitometer

​Bone density scanning, which is often referred to as dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, or DEXA, uses small amounts of ionizing radiation to map and measure the amount of bone loss in a patient, usually on the lower spine or the hips. This is one of the quickest and most reliable ways to assess the patient’s risk for bone fractures and to diagnose osteoporosis.

MiniBone_DensitometerThe Sunlight MiniOmni Bone Densitometer is one of the most cost-effective bone sonometers currently available and provides these features:

  • Accuracy — Based on Sunlight Omnipath quantitative technology, the MiniOmni provides unrivaled accuracy for multiple bone density readings taken from multiple points on the patient’s body.
  • Portable — At around the size of a hardcover book, the MiniOmni is lightweight and can be taken virtually anyplace people can go.
  • Non-invasive — Taking a bone density scan is quick, easy and requires no special preparation on the part of the patient.
  • Versatile — Comes with a database containing four ethnic references for men, women and children, allowing for an even more specific and accurate reading.
  • Cost-effective — At almost half the price of other densitometers, we currently offer special pricing on this unit. In addition, the MiniOmni comes with a one-year warranty.

Portable, accurate and affordable, the MiniOmni can serve a wide range of practices and is particularly useful for general practitioners who may need to treat a number of different patients suffering from bone-related complaints.​

CPT Code 76977: Ultrasound bone density measurement and interpretation, peripheral site(s), any method. hold a $7.16 national Average reimbursement; tests for 15 minutes.

Overnight Oximetry

People who suffer from what they suspect to be a sleep disorder often have a hard time pinpointing the exact condition that’s keeping them up at night.

One of the most popular diagnostic tests is to have patients undergo an overnight pulse oximetry test screening, which can provide the crucial data needed to determine whether a patent suffers from sleep apnea or other common sleep disorders.

This simple test evaluates blood oxygen levels and can be done at home. Unlike other diagnostic methods used to detect sleep apnea, oximetry is so simple that there’s little chance the patient will make a mistake in using the device.

WristOx_2_SpO2This can be seen in the technologically sophisticated but surprisingly simple Nonin WristOx 2, Model 3150, the most advanced wrist-worn pulse oximeter available, and can be used for cardio-ambulatory monitoring, remote wireless monitoring and overnight studies. Patients simply wear the device like a wristwatch, then connect the easy-fit sensor to the end of their index finger.

Capable of storing 1,080 hours of memory, the WristOx 2 measures the pulse rate and SPO2 values at various sampling rates. For more efficient diagnosis, the unit can securely transfer data via Bluetooth to nVISION Data Management Software to generate a full report from the data collected by the oximeter.

Versatile, simple and comfortable, the WristOx 2 is an essential piece of equipment for any office or practice that regularly deals with patients suffering from sleep disorders.

CPT Code 94762: Overnight Oximetry, Noninvasive ear or pulse oximetry for oxygen saturation; by continuous overnight monitoring (separate procedure) hold a $24.72 national Average reimbursement. Overnight, Patient Hookup, tests for less than 5 minutes.

 

Battery-Operated Cauteries

​For decades, Bovie Medical has been a leader in the design and manufacture of battery-operated cauteries. Engineered for safety and precision, their units have continually evolved and now feature a safety-enhanced snap design and recessed button to reduce the chances of it accidentally turning on.

Bovie Medical makes more models of cauteries than any other company in the world. From single-use pens to units with replaceable tips and various shaft lengths to meet the needs of any number of medical or surgical procedures, Bovie Medical has something suitable for most medical practices. Here’s an overview of the options:

AA00_imgSingle use. Each single-use cautery pen comes in its own sterile wrapper. Practitioners simply peel open the package, insert the required batteries and remove the cap.


DEL1Change-A-Tip models. 
For medical practices where reusing a unit is a priority, the Change-A-Tip models allow you to switch out the tips and adjust sizes as needed.

 

AA01High-temperature cauteries. For controlling diffuse bleeding to any operation that requires pinpoint hemostasis, Bovie Medical’s high-temperature cauteries range between 1,600 and 2,200 degrees Fahrenheit.

Low-temperature cauteries. The four low-temperature models manufactured by Bovie are designed specifically for ophthalmology. Ranging between 700 and 1,300 degrees Fahrenheit, these units have a four-year lifespan and are ideal for surgeons who require pinpoint hemostasis.

To learn more about battery-operated cauteries or any other medical device, contact a Medical Device Depot representative today.​

Proper use of an eyewash fountain

Emergency eye wash stations, while performing a simple but vital function, come in a variety of models. While portable units allow one to set up these important emergency stations in virtually any location, they have limited water supply and don’t function as well as fixed eye rinse stations that hooked into a water system.

329200_imgThe Opti-Klens I Eyewash Fountain is a simple adapter that can transform most lab faucets into an eyewash system. With no special plumbing required, it’s easy to set up.

Once installed, be sure to review the following steps for properly rinsing your eyes.

  1. Don’t wait or second guess. Go immediately to the eye wash fountain. Better to be overly cautious than risk a permanent eye injury.
  1. Use your fingers to hold open your eyes.
  1. Roll your eyeballs around, up and down, from right to left. This will ensure fluid is reaching and flushing all areas of your eyes.
  1. Continue to do this for 15 minutes. You need to be sure you are diluting the chemical and flushing it from your eye. This cannot happen in under 15 minutes!
  1. Take out your contacts. Don’t stop to take them out before beginning the process; do this while flushing your eyes.
  1. Seek professional help. Once you have completed flushing your eyes, visit a doctor. There may be important steps you need to take to preserve your vision.

Diagnose OSA with the SleepView Monitor

Some medical conditions can’t be diagnosed by visiting the clinic or through lab work, but require the patient to actively administer the test themselves. To many in the medical field, this may seem daunting as the margin for error can be relatively high when left to nonprofessionals.

However, engineers and designers have gone to great lengths to make it easy for those who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to properly diagnose their condition.

SleepView MonitorThe SleepView Monitor works when the provider suspects a patient may be suffering from OSA and orders a sleep test to be performed. The patient leaves with the SleepView Monitor and, following the easy instructions their health care provider gave them, sets up and runs the test in their own home. In some ways it’s as simple as strapping on a heart and airflow monitor, sleeping through the night, then returning the collected data to the clinic’s office. From there, a board-certified sleep physician interprets the data and makes a recommendation for treatment.

The convenience and precision of this self-administered sleep test is ideal for clinics or health care services with multiple locations. Regardless of the specialists on hand, it allows for a maximum number of patients to be tested for OSA and for an expert to make sense of the data and provide an accurate diagnosis. This allows for more people to be diagnosed, treated and to live better lives.

Ophthalmoscopes: The most critical tool for eye doctors.

12800_imgAs the medical world continues to be transformed by digital technology and increasingly sophisticated instruments that promise more precise and accurate diagnostic features, some things remain unchanged. For ophthalmologists, one of the most basic, yet critical tools used to diagnose eye conditions remains the ophthalmoscope.

In many ways, these tools are better than ever, but proper use still depends on a high degree of competence that comes with training and practice.

Regardless of the model you use, be sure your ophthalmoscope has both a rheostatic control switch that allows you to manually adjust the amount of light emitted and a range of aperture selections. These features give you maximum control over light levels, allowing you to truly customize the tool to suit your individual patients. To ensure you get the most out of your equipment, follow these best practices:

  • Eye examinations should take place in a dimly lit room.
  • Before the examination begins, conduct a red reflex test. The results of this test may indicate various eye disorders.
  • When examining a patient’s left eye, use your left hand. Likewise, when examining a patient’s right eye, use your right hand.
  • Examine the optic disk first.
  • Following an evaluation of the optic lens, look at the retinal arteries and the four vascular arcades. Doing this helps to position yourself opposite of the eye’s movement.
  • Finally, have the patient look directly into the light and examine their macula. This part comes last because for many patients it is the most uncomfortable part of the procedure

11810-imgThe revolutionary PanOptic provides easy entry into the eye, together with a wider field of view to more easily observe conditions such as hypertension, diabetic retinopathy, and papilledema. It’s the newest and has the 5x larger view of the fundus vs. standard ophthalmoscopes in an undilated eye. It also provides 25º field of view vs. the standard 5º field of vi

Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor

Taking a patient’s blood pressure is standard practice for most medical checkups. But the fact is, if a patient suffers from high blood pressure, or you suspect they might have high blood pressure, taking a periodic reading only provides a snapshot. Over the course of a day or a week, various factors can cause a patient’s heart rate and blood pressure to fluctuate.

Think of it this way: If you want to know what the climate of a city is, you need to do more than take random readings from a thermometer. You could end up thinking Minneapolis is a warm city! Instead, you need to take a number of temperature readings at regular intervals.

ABPM-7100STo accurately diagnose and monitor a patient, you need a larger, more regular sampling of their blood pressure. An Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor does exactly this. Over the course of 24 hours, the patient wears this noninvasive device while going about their day. Usually, a patient wears the blood pressure cuff under their sleeve and the monitor, which is about the size of an iPod, on their belt. During the course of the 24-hour period, the patient keeps a diary, recording information about their activities, stress levels, etc. Every 25 to 30 minutes, the Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor takes a regular reading.

By providing a more accurate representation of a patient’s overall blood pressure than can be measured in a traditional clinical situation, this process can give way to a better diagnosis and more effective treatment.

Medical equipment financing: Should I lease or buy?

For those who work in the purchasing departments for hospitals, medical offices or other organizations that use medical equipment, one of the most common questions is not so much what do we need to purchase, but what advantages might leasing medical equipment have over purchasing it?

There is no easy way to answer this question, but a review of the following key pros and cons of leasing vs. buying should help you decide what type of medical equipment financing is best for your situation.

Leasing pros:

  • Low upfront cost
  • Services, maintenance and warranty are often all wrapped up in the leasing price
  • When properly structured, leasing payments are fully tax deductible as an operational expense
  • Easy turnover if you want updated equipment

Leasing cons:

  • Not a good option if you plan to use the piece of equipment for a long time
  • The life of the lease may end up being far more than if you had purchased the equipment
  • You build up no equity, and with no option to resell the equipment, you cannot make any money back
  • Not all equipment can be leased

Purchasing pros:

  • Owning the equipment allows you make needed modifications or adjustments without violating the terms of a lease
  • Various tax incentives under Section 179
  • You don’t have to deal with contracts
  • Many medical equipment manufacturers have fantastic warranties
  • You can recoup some of the costs by reselling the equipment

Purchasing cons:

  • The initial cost can be considerable. This can prevent you from buying exactly what you want as well as tie up funds you may need for other purchases
  • Equipment may become outdated, especially digital technology
  • You must keep up with maintenance and front the cost of most repairs

A variety of audiometers for your ENT clinic

Used to measure hearing loss and evaluate the hearing acuity in an individual, audiometers have come a long way in the past few decades. Though more precise and efficient, their basic setup is the same: A computer delivers a number of tones at different intensities to a patient wearing a set of headphones. The patient responds to the tones they can hear, and this data is used to help determine what kind of hearing aid they may need.

Different practices require different audiometers. To give you a sample of the variety available, here are three audiometers to suit the various needs of ENT clinics.

For children

Pilot_Hearing_Test_AudiometerThe Digital Pilot Hearing Test Audiometer is engineered to screen children as young as three years old. It works by turning the procedure into a game, where children are asked to look at pictures and match them to the sentences they hear. It’s a great example of ingenuity and technology coming together to serve the youngest patients.

For portability

MA_27For those looking for a compact unit that still allows you to test using a tone, pulse or warble at a full range of frequencies, the MA 27 Portable Audiometer provides an optimal solution. Easy to set up and easy to use, this unit is perfect for house calls or as a backup machine.

 

Customizable

Over the years, many doctors and practitioners develop a very ES3-2specific method for testing patients. In these cases, they want more than a one-size-fits-all audiometer. The Earscan 3 is a fully programmable audiometer that allows users to customize it to fit their needs and those of their patients.

 

Understanding Section 179 for 2017

As we make our way into 2017, one day looms larger than all others: Tax Day.

Many medical practitioners and those in private practice will be busy the next several weeks preparing for the big day (April 18, in case you didn’t know). One of the most important parts of their tax filings is Section 179. This is the part of the tax code where businesses can deduct the cost of qualified equipment and software.

Each year, Section 179 is a little different, so let’s forget about past years and consider how it will affect you in 2017.

Limit for deduction

Businesses can deduct the full purchase price of new and used equipment and off-the-shelf software if it is purchased or financed between January 1, 2017 and December 31, 2017.

Spending cap

To qualify for the Section 179 deduction, companies can spend a maximum of $2 million on equipment in 2017. This cap exists to ensure Section 179 remains a true “small business” deduction.

Bonus depreciation

The bonus depreciation isn’t always offered, but in 2017, it is being offered at 50 percent. The “bonus” is that even if you spend more than $2 million on equipment, you can still get a 50 percent deduction on new equipment you buy that goes over the spending cap.

With this in mind, the bonus depreciation makes 2017 a good year to buy extra equipment.