Category Archives: Nasiff

Choosing the right Holter system for your practice

With advances in mobile cardiac telemetry, more and more physicians are able to offer ambulatory cardiac monitoring. Not only are these services easier than ever to provide, but recent technology makes them more effective for patients experiencing cardiac issues.

But not all cardiac monitors work the same. So when you’re choosing an ambulatory ECG or Holter system, keep the following tips in mind.

You’ll need fast reporting:

CARDIOCARD_HOLTERThe Nasiff CardioCard PC-Based Holter ECG System connects to several EMR systems for efficient and accurate reporting. This system also offers practical software and database management systems with training, customer support and guaranteed quality.

 

You’ll need an easy-to-use system:

4-000-0110-2The Midmark IQholter Digital Holter w/ Recorder is engineered to a new standard for ease of use. Simply enter your patient’s demographics, select auto report, and start scanning. The system will automatically accept, reject or change classified occurrences throughout the entire program to affect further processing.

 

You’ll need complete accuracy:

Additionally, the Midmark IQholter Digital Holter w/ Recorder system has sophisticated digital filtering techniques to help eliminate errors due to noise. This means you can trust you’re getting an accurate report.

Once you decide on the right Holter system for your practice, head over to Medical Device Depot for prices that will fit your budget. Leasing is available on many of our models, so check out our vast selection today!

Medical Device Depot – Manufacturer Spotlight: Nasiff

Nasiff Associates made its mark on the medical device world 27 years ago when it developed the world’s first PC-based resting electrocardiograph, allowing for the automatic recording of electrical heart activity via computer.

“Nobody else was doing that in a way that was useful in the clinical environment,” founder Roger E. Nasiff once told the Central New York Business Journal. “Cardiology is our center, because that’s where most people need help medically.”

The device greatly improved the efficiency of the ECG process, allowing for clearer definition of heart rhythm problems that might require a pacemaker or drug therapy along with secure databases and full networking capabilities. The data also began to assist with medical research. After that, the company developed a comparable product that worked with notebooks, followed by cardiology diagnostic machines adapted to wireless and mobile devices.

Since then the New York-based manufacturer has become a specialist in medical diagnostic and administration products that integrate into PCs. Its primary goal is creating a diverse line of U.S.-manufactured innovative devices that efficiently manage data at the point of care.

That line includes everything from defebrillators to electrosurgery tools to feeding pumps to ultrasound machines. Nasiff devices are used in a range of medical specialties extending from bariatric to ob/gyn to radiology to respiratory. The privately held company sells primarily through distributors but also ships directly worldwide, offering a best-price guarantee on all merchandise as well as free installation and training support.

Owner and CEO Nasiff, Ph.D. is a U.S. Air Force veteran and former engineer who’s been in the medical diagnostic field longer than 20 years.

Issues with medical device patent litigation

According to the National Law Review, the number of patent infringement disputes filed annually at the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) has more than tripled over the last 20 years. While this is not limited to medical devices, it certainly contains a good number of them. In a field where new innovations bring plenty of recognition, praise and good money, it is important to keep intellectual property safely under wraps. Medical device patents are not a new phenomenon, but with the growing number of suits, it is important to protect medical technology from the beginning.

According to Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, U.S. intellectual property owners can seek exclusion orders that do not allow the importation of articles that infringe their patents or other intellectual property rights. If the case is won, the infringing product will not be allowed to cross the border into U.S. territory.

In order to prove a patent suit, the complaint must contain four things, according to the International Trade Commission Trail Lawyers Association:

  1. That articles are being imported into the United States
  2. That those articles infringe complainant’s patent or patents
  3. That the complaining company or its licensee has made sufficient economic investments in exploiting its patent in the United States to satisfy section 337’s definition of a “domestic industry”
  4. That the alleged unfair act has caused or threatens to cause injury

Check out Medical Device Depot’s number of American-made medical device manufacturers such as MidmarkNasiff, Mortara and Welch Allyn.