Category Archives: HealthCare

Mononucleosis Test

Also known as the kissing disease, mononucleosis is transmitted through saliva, coughing or sneezing. This virus typically affects young adults and adolescents, but it can affect any age group. While mono shows common symptoms like fatigue, sore throat, fever, swollen lymph nodes, swollen tonsils and headache, the most effective diagnostic test is a Mononucleosis Rapid Test. The virus has an incubation period of approximately four to six weeks, with symptoms subsiding within a couple of weeks.

This tests gives results within 8 minutes and earns $7.06 back in reimbursements every time it is run. It works by detecting mononucleosis heterophile antibodies in whole blood, serum or plasma, and the type of sample used does not change the reimbursement amount. If heterophil antibodies are present, the blood sample clumps. With 99.9% sensitivity, the Accutest Infectious Mononucleosis Rapid Test Device available at Medical Device Depot is a reliable test.

If you want fast results, check out the rest of the selection of reliable devices at Medical Device Depot to outfit your practice with testing tools that bring revenue back to your practice.

H. Pylori Test

As a medical professional, you know there are good bacteria and bad bacteria. While healthy bodies thrive when good bacteria are present in the gut, undetected bad bacteria can pose quite the risk. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is just one type of bad bacteria that can hide in the digestive tract. If left undiagnosed and untreated, the bacteria can cause ulcers in the lining of the stomach or the upper part of the small intestine. In some cases, the infection can even lead to stomach cancer.

Fortunately, patients who exhibit symptoms of ulcers, such as bloating, nausea, vomiting or lack of appetite, can undergo a quick test to diagnose this infection. This simple blood test costs $3.68 for the disposable parts and lasts approximately 3-7 minutes. When the test is complete, your practice will earn back $17.66 in reimbursements. The Accustrip H. Pylori Rapid Test is a reliable option for fast results. This test is a rapid lateral flow, qualitative immunoassay, which is intended for use at point-of-care facilities for detection in human blood or serum.

If you are searching for an H. Pylori Test Immunoassay for infectious agent antibodies, look no further. Medical Device Depot has the perfect disposable test, which will continue to bring money to your practice with each use.

When to Administer a Hypothyroidism Test

Hypothyroidism is difficult to detect in its early stages because it may be attributed to any number of reasons for weight gain or fatigue. But as it progresses, forgetfulness, a sluggish mind, depression and hoarseness can all serve as red flags. Hypothyroidism prevents the thyroid gland from producing enough of certain hormones, which are needed in order to balance the chemical reactions in the body. This can be caused by medication, auto-immune disease, treatments for hyperthyroidism or radiation therapy. Women over the age of 60 are especially susceptible.

Because hypothyroidism is more common among older women, your practice may choose to screen for the disorder during routine annual physicals. Some practices also recommend that pregnant women are tested. If left untreated, hypothyroidism can cause a number of health problems, such as obesity, joint pain, infertility and heart disease.

If patients complain of symptoms or you notice an increase in any of them, a hypothyroidism test should be administered. You can purchase the Accutest THS Rapid Test for Thyroid Stimulating Hormone through Medical Device Depot at $200 for a box of 20 tests. This simple and essential screening test earns in $23.69 in reimbursement to help mitigate its overall cost. The patient will know within 10 minutes if his or her TSH is elevated, and with 98.5% sensitivity and 96.9% specificity, this is a reliable and accurate test that you and the patient can trust.

The Progression of the Medical Device Tax Repeal

As the Affordable Healthcare Act—or Obamacare as it is commonly called—moves along, medical device manufacturers are watching closely. That’s because the hotly debated Medical Device Tax continues to meet resistance among manufacturers and politicians alike. The tax, which began in 2013, was created to help fund the health-care law, and to do so, it takes 2.3 percent from the makers of defibrillators, pacemakers, artificial joints and heart stents.

After garnering disapproval from both sides of the aisle, the House of Representatives voted to repeal the medical device tax in June by a vote of 280-140. Those opposing the repeal state that completely eliminating the medical device tax without establishing an alternative area of funding creates a shortfall of about $25 billion.

Because the House’s decision was one vote short of a veto-proof consensus, the vote will go to the Senate next where the lack of alternative funding has stalled the repeal previously. Even if the Senate approves the repeal, President Obama holds veto power. The prospective strategy may attach the medical device tax repeal to other legislation that Obama would find hard to veto or to negotiate to limit the tax. In any case, the Senate will determine the next step in this long debate.

Will the iWatch be the next big medical device?

With the constant evolution of technology, there is always the possibility that a new device or technology will be the next best thing in the medical device world. While consumers were elated to hear that Apple would be joining the wearable technology ranks with the iWatch, the health-care industry is equally excited to learn that Apple may have medical uses in mind for the anticipated iWatch.

Over the past year, Apple has acquired at least six prominent biomedicine experts, mostly from the sensor technology field, according to Reuters. This expertise could allow the iWatch to monitor everything from blood-sugar levels to nutrition, which goes beyond what the fitness-oriented devices can currently offer. Some of these notable hires include Dr. Michael O’Reilly, the former chief medical officer of Masimo. He was integral to the company’s research into pulse oximetry, which measures the amount of oxygen in the blood. Another hire is Ravi Narasimhan, former vice president of Vital Connect, a Silicon Valley–based maker of wearable biosensors. Additionally, Roy J.E.M. Raymann led research into how devices can more accurately monitor temperature, hormone production, and circadian rhythms to boost sleep quality at Philips’ sleep laboratory. Hardware developer Nancy Dougherty, of San Francisco start-up Sano Intelligence, helped create one of the most sophisticated sensors yet, capable of tracking kidney and liver function, measuring electrolytes, and determining, in real time, the amount of sugar in the blood.

While much of the talk about what the iWatch may offer is mere speculation, Apple does have a reputation of revolutionizing current markets. A mobile health executive told Reuters that Apple has aspirations beyond wearable devices and is considering a full health and fitness services platform modeled on its apps store. While Apple will not comment on such claims, a medical iWatch could be a boon to the medical device community. This could go far beyond the rudimentary offerings of current wearable devices and provide medical professionals real insight into their patients’ vitals and much more.

 

How do apps affect the medical device industry?

There’s an app for everything these days, so it should come as no surprise that there are health-related apps as well – a lot of them. In fact, as far back as 2013 there were already more than 43,000 medical apps; researchers prognosticate that the health app market will reach $58.8 billion by 2020.

But is the health app explosion a good thing for the medical device industry and the general population?

It depends, namely on the information or services each individual app is providing. Apps have the potential to be helpful to the medical device industry by partnering with current devices to transmit data more efficiently, as well as provide supplemental information about a patient that the person may not know or be able to convey themselves. However, apps that provide their users with poor information can have a negative influence on the user’s health and health choices.

As the mobile health industry has evolved, the FDA has kept pace, treating health apps as it would any other medical device. “The FDA encourages the development of mobile medical apps that improve health care and provide consumers and health-care professionals with valuable health information. The FDA also has a public health responsibility to oversee the safety and effectiveness of medical devices – including mobile medical apps,” it said in a statement. The FDA already works to determine which apps classify as medical devices and which do not merit FDA registration.

Effective health apps have the potential to be an important partner to the medical device industry, and that benefit figures only to grow as apps develop and the medical device industry itself works to create the apps it needs. But no matter the new tech, there will always be a place for apps that share accurate information in a safe, effective and healthy manner.

Is Obamacare’s medical device tax working?

On October 1, numerous Americans gained access to the new marketplaces mandated by Obamacare. While the health-care program is multifaceted, the medical device tax that came tied to the program has been another hot-button issue. The tax increased by 2.3 percent on gross revenues.

The tax that was put on medical device manufacturers forced such companies to lay off (or avoid hiring) about 33,000 workers, according to a survey completed by Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed). The AdvaMed report stated that about 14,000 of those workers were those who companies had to cut. The medical device tax is just one aspect of the Affordable Care Act that allows citizens to attain medical care.

Those on the other side of the issue counter that the medical-device industry can easily afford the extra tax without having to tax the industry. In order to repeal the tax over the next 10 years, Congress would need to come up with roughly $30 billion dollars. Those opposed to the tax are concerned that it will hurt productivity and innovation of smaller device companies that do not have the means to continue running with this required tax.

Heart Disease: Are women now more at risk than men?

Nasiff Cardiocard Mobile

A recent article released by Nasiff notes the increasing risk of heart disease in older women when compared to men of similar age. In particular:

“Statistics from 2009 show that breast cancer was directly related to the deaths of 40,467 women in the US, while heart disease accounted for 292,188 women. Moreover, the rate of heart disease in women under the age of 55 is rising year on year, despite overall reductions in the total number of people nationwide dying from the disease.”

While healthy eating and regular exercise is important, regular doctors office visits and a greater understanding of the risks of heart disease are equally important. Regular checkups and monitoring of vital signs, including blood pressure and cardiopulmonary health are important to maintaining a healthy lifestyle.

For more information on heart-related equipment and other medical devices, call 877-646-3300 or visit Medical Device Depot.