Monthly Archives: April 2017

Proper use of an eyewash fountain

Emergency eye wash stations, while performing a simple but vital function, come in a variety of models. While portable units allow one to set up these important emergency stations in virtually any location, they have limited water supply and don’t function as well as fixed eye rinse stations that hooked into a water system.

329200_imgThe Opti-Klens I Eyewash Fountain is a simple adapter that can transform most lab faucets into an eyewash system. With no special plumbing required, it’s easy to set up.

Once installed, be sure to review the following steps for properly rinsing your eyes.

  1. Don’t wait or second guess. Go immediately to the eye wash fountain. Better to be overly cautious than risk a permanent eye injury.
  1. Use your fingers to hold open your eyes.
  1. Roll your eyeballs around, up and down, from right to left. This will ensure fluid is reaching and flushing all areas of your eyes.
  1. Continue to do this for 15 minutes. You need to be sure you are diluting the chemical and flushing it from your eye. This cannot happen in under 15 minutes!
  1. Take out your contacts. Don’t stop to take them out before beginning the process; do this while flushing your eyes.
  1. Seek professional help. Once you have completed flushing your eyes, visit a doctor. There may be important steps you need to take to preserve your vision.

Diagnose OSA with the SleepView Monitor

Some medical conditions can’t be diagnosed by visiting the clinic or through lab work, but require the patient to actively administer the test themselves. To many in the medical field, this may seem daunting as the margin for error can be relatively high when left to nonprofessionals.

However, engineers and designers have gone to great lengths to make it easy for those who suffer from obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) to properly diagnose their condition.

SleepView MonitorThe SleepView Monitor works when the provider suspects a patient may be suffering from OSA and orders a sleep test to be performed. The patient leaves with the SleepView Monitor and, following the easy instructions their health care provider gave them, sets up and runs the test in their own home. In some ways it’s as simple as strapping on a heart and airflow monitor, sleeping through the night, then returning the collected data to the clinic’s office. From there, a board-certified sleep physician interprets the data and makes a recommendation for treatment.

The convenience and precision of this self-administered sleep test is ideal for clinics or health care services with multiple locations. Regardless of the specialists on hand, it allows for a maximum number of patients to be tested for OSA and for an expert to make sense of the data and provide an accurate diagnosis. This allows for more people to be diagnosed, treated and to live better lives.

Ophthalmoscopes: The most critical tool for eye doctors.

12800_imgAs the medical world continues to be transformed by digital technology and increasingly sophisticated instruments that promise more precise and accurate diagnostic features, some things remain unchanged. For ophthalmologists, one of the most basic, yet critical tools used to diagnose eye conditions remains the ophthalmoscope.

In many ways, these tools are better than ever, but proper use still depends on a high degree of competence that comes with training and practice.

Regardless of the model you use, be sure your ophthalmoscope has both a rheostatic control switch that allows you to manually adjust the amount of light emitted and a range of aperture selections. These features give you maximum control over light levels, allowing you to truly customize the tool to suit your individual patients. To ensure you get the most out of your equipment, follow these best practices:

  • Eye examinations should take place in a dimly lit room.
  • Before the examination begins, conduct a red reflex test. The results of this test may indicate various eye disorders.
  • When examining a patient’s left eye, use your left hand. Likewise, when examining a patient’s right eye, use your right hand.
  • Examine the optic disk first.
  • Following an evaluation of the optic lens, look at the retinal arteries and the four vascular arcades. Doing this helps to position yourself opposite of the eye’s movement.
  • Finally, have the patient look directly into the light and examine their macula. This part comes last because for many patients it is the most uncomfortable part of the procedure

11810-imgThe revolutionary PanOptic provides easy entry into the eye, together with a wider field of view to more easily observe conditions such as hypertension, diabetic retinopathy, and papilledema. It’s the newest and has the 5x larger view of the fundus vs. standard ophthalmoscopes in an undilated eye. It also provides 25º field of view vs. the standard 5º field of vi

Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor

Taking a patient’s blood pressure is standard practice for most medical checkups. But the fact is, if a patient suffers from high blood pressure, or you suspect they might have high blood pressure, taking a periodic reading only provides a snapshot. Over the course of a day or a week, various factors can cause a patient’s heart rate and blood pressure to fluctuate.

Think of it this way: If you want to know what the climate of a city is, you need to do more than take random readings from a thermometer. You could end up thinking Minneapolis is a warm city! Instead, you need to take a number of temperature readings at regular intervals.

ABPM-7100STo accurately diagnose and monitor a patient, you need a larger, more regular sampling of their blood pressure. An Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor does exactly this. Over the course of 24 hours, the patient wears this noninvasive device while going about their day. Usually, a patient wears the blood pressure cuff under their sleeve and the monitor, which is about the size of an iPod, on their belt. During the course of the 24-hour period, the patient keeps a diary, recording information about their activities, stress levels, etc. Every 25 to 30 minutes, the Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitor takes a regular reading.

By providing a more accurate representation of a patient’s overall blood pressure than can be measured in a traditional clinical situation, this process can give way to a better diagnosis and more effective treatment.